Rabbit Hunting with Slingshot for Survival – Top 5 Tips You Have to Know

Rabbit Hunting with Slingshot for SurvivalHunting rabbits with a slingshot in a survival situation is not only challenging but also exciting. Rabbits are very small preys that get scared quite fast. When in a real survival situation, a slingshot is one of those primitive tools you can make with easy if you did not have one with you.

Slingshots are the perfect weapon for survival while rabbits are the tastiest meal you can get in the wild. This makes rabbit hunting crucial for all preppers. You need to know how to kill a rabbit using a slingshot in the wild if you want to survive.

The rabbit is probably the biggest game you can hunt with a slingshot. They are perfect for all survivalists since they are rich in proteins and can supply you with good amounts of meat. However, killing one is not as easy as most people might think. You must have the best hunting slingshot with you and know how to use it properly. If not, you must know how to make one using simple rubber bands.  Here are five tips you have to know if you want to make a kill.

  1. Stalk rabbits stealthily or flush them out of the bushes

Rabbits are quite sensitive and will run away the moment they notice people around. You must learn to stalk them quietly without alerting them to your presence. If the grass is high enough, you can always get closer to a rabbit. Take a few steps before stopping and surveying the area. If rabbits raise their heads to chew, freeze for a moment until they return to feed again. Get as close as you can and aim your slingshot making a clean kill.

However, if you can’t notice any, you can go right ahead and flush the bushes looking for any movements. Rabbits will run away when they hear movements in their vicinity. Even so, they never run far with most heading to the nearest hole. Watch where they went and play the waiting game with them. Stand lock still and the rabbit will come out after a few minutes giving you an opportunity to shoot.

  1. Aim for the head

A slingshot makes for the perfect DIY weapons out there when you don’t want to waste precious ammo on killing a rabbit. It is not an advanced weapon and will not kill rabbits if you don’t aim for the head and hit with force. It is one thing hunting a rabbit with a slingshot and another thing killing one. If you hit the body, the chances are that the rabbit will be injured but not dead. It will run away injured which is not a good thing. You would have missed your kill, and left the rabbit in pain. A clean shot to the head will either kill the rabbit or make it unconscious enough until you get there.

A shot of the body might also cause internal bleeding and ruin your meat.  Shots on the body only work with a good compound bow and sharp arrows that penetrate through the skin of the rabbit.

  1. Do not underestimate the power of natural obstacles

This is where most people go wrong when hunting rabbits with slingshots. You can get as close as you want and have a clean shot but only miss the kill due to the natural obstacles on the way. Even the simple grass on your way will affect your shot and make it less strong. You can have a good shot to the head, but if the shot hits the grass, it will lose its power and only cause minimal damage to the rabbit. The rabbit might die days later which is no good for your survival situation.

If you’re being obstructed by grass or other natural things, the best thing to do is stand still waiting for the rabbit to change position.Lost Survival Lessons from Our Forefathers

 

  1. Avoid things with strong smells

Strong smells alerts rabbits that there are people nearby. Make sure you don’t have any deodorant or perfume on you. This will alert rabbits that have a strong sense of smell from a distance. Foods with a strong smell must also be avoided. If you have to have any foods with you when hunting, cereals or anything that does not smell will do just fine.

Apart from the smells, make sure you don’t expose your arms or hands as rabbits will always run away the moment they notice you.

  1. Practice using your slingshot

Getting a precise shot with a slingshot is not easy as it looks. Remember if you miss the first shot, the rabbit gets startled and runs away. Do daily practices of slingshot shooting away from the comfort of your home aiming at targets from all manner of positions. In a real survival situation, you don’t have the comfort of using your slingshot from any angle you wish. You must learn to use a slingshot when on vertical as you’re sometimes required to climb high to spot the rabbits.

Conclusion

Having your slingshot with you everywhere will come in handy especially when you need some good source of proteins. Hunting rabbits with a slingshot can provide you with rich proteins to get you through the harsh periods in the wild.  You must know of places where you’re most likely to find rabbits, how to stalk them, where to hit and how to shoot with a slingshot.

Article written by Brandon Cox for Prepper’s Will.

About Author:

Brandon Cox is the founder of StayHunting, who is passionate about all things of hunting and fitness. Through his hunting website, he would like to share tips & tricks, finest tech that will excite all of the intricacies of hunting whether you be an amateur or a professional.

Other Useful Resources:

Sold Out After Crisis (Best 37 Items To Hoard For When a Disaster Strikes)

Alive after the crisis (The Most Comprehensive Disaster Survival Course)

Survival MD (Knowledge to survive any medical crisis situation)

The LOST WAYS (The vital self-sufficiency lessons our great grand-fathers left us)

The Stockpiling Lesson (How to make a one year stockpile of food and other survival items)

Food For Freedom (The easiest solution to produce food during a water crisis) 

Liberty Generator (How to gain complete energy independence)

Bullet Proof Home (Learn how to Safeguard your Home)

Blackout USA (Video about EMP survival and preparedness guide)

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